Summary of the Change Diet

The Change Diet is constructed to be very simple. It uses pocket change to keep track of calories consumed daily. One cent stands for ten calories, making it easy to count them out: just chop off the last digit on the package.

The starting count of coins for a day is the same as your weight. This works because we eat about 10 calories a day to maintain our current weight. Eat less, and we lose weight.

There are three guiding principles in the Change Diet:

First, weight is lost slowly, in small chunks. This can be set by the dieter, but the key point is to NOT try to lose all of the excess poundage too quickly. Our bodies naturally try to keep us at whatever weight we are currently holding.

So, lose weight for a little while, and then stay there until our bodies adjust to the new intake.

Second, there are no forbidden foods. Forbidden foods are an artificial way of controlling weight. For example, low-carb or low-fat diets reduce calories by limiting which foods we can eat.

The problem with that is that our bodies need all kinds of food. If we limit the types of food we eat, eventually our bodies will demand that food, and we’re more likely to fail the diet at that point.

Instead, the Change Diet uses its third principle: eat less and exercise more. Foods are not forbidden. Instead, we just eat smaller portions of them. If we’re used to having seconds at supper, cut the amount in half, or eliminate it altogether.

The rest of my posts on the Change Diet flesh out those principles.